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Video Calibration


With these files you should be able to test contrast, brightness, saturation, gamma and audio levels on computer screens (both CRT, Trinitron, TFT and possibly also OLED) and both normal and high-def TVs and even certain .avi enabled DVD players.

These video clips are all 60 seconds long. Audio is mp3 format, 48 KHz, stereo. If you don't know which file to choose, i recommend the first one.

Calibration Files

File Resolution Framerate Luma range Audio Recommended for
HDTV 1920 x 1080 10 fps 0-255 Pink noise, 0 dB Playing high definition video on a computer screen
HDTV 1280 x 720 30 fps 0-255 1 KHz, 0 dB Playing high definition video on a computer screen
HDTV 1280 x 720 30 fps 16-235 1 KHz, 0 dB Playing high def. video that seems contrast-less (due to faulty YUV-RGB conversion)
PAL 720 x 576 25 fps 0-255 1 KHz, 0 dB Playing video on a computer screen (typical)
PAL 720 x 576 25 fps 16-235 1 KHz, 0 dB Playing video that seems contrast-less (due to faulty YUV-RGB conversion)
PNG 800 x 600 - 0-255 - Calibrating a computer screen
PNG 1920 x 1080 - 0-255 - Calibrating a computer screen

The following guides will not work for all devices, as adjustment controls may differ.

CRT and Trinitron step-by-step adjustment guide:

  • Display the PNG image
  • Adjust brightness on your TV (the "sun" icon) until the background is as dark as possible, but 3 out of 4 of the dark squares in the box in the middle are still visible.
  • Adjust contrast to a comfortable level
  • Adjust saturation so that the colored boxes get a pure and non-fainted color. If the green or yellow boxes seem brighter than the white box in the middle, turn down saturation.

Computer screen overlay settings adjustment guide:

  • Loop the .avi file in your favorite media player.
  • Disable any color corrections in the mediaplayer and video codec.
  • Find the Video Overlay Settings in your control panel or Catalyst control center
  • Adjust Brightness and Contrast so that the white area in the middle is as bright as possible and the dark area above it is as dark as possible, while you can still see all 8 squares.
  • Turn saturation up as much as possible without the 4 squares in the red, green and blue boxes left dissappear.


Troubleshooting:

Here are some examples of what the calibration image may look like, and some guesses as to what solutions may help.

CRT IPS/LED/TN OLED

Overexposed

over exposed
Notice how the faint squares inside the bright square in the middle are all gone.
Should not be possible. Check your signal source output level or settings. Reduce either "contrast" or "brightness" or the red/green/blue gain level in the menu of your monitor or graphics card settings. Awaiting more info on OLED screens.

Crushed blacks

crushed blacks
All the really dark squares are entirely gone, and the colors appear a bit exaggerated.
Increase "brightness" (sun icon) until the dark squares are barely visible, still leaving the black areas entirely black. ?

Hazy blacks

hazy blacks
The black background is not deep black but rather hazy and gray looking.
Decrease "brightness" (sun icon) until the black areas become as black as they can, and at least three of the four the dark squares are still visible. ?

Oversaturated

over saturated
Notice how the faint squares inside the bright part of the colored squares are all gone, whereas the similar ones in the white area in the middle are still visible.
Should not be possible. Check your signal source output saturation setting. Reduce "saturation" in the menu of your monitor or graphics card settings. ?

Undersaturated

under saturated
Colors look pale and washed out. Orange colors appear brown.
Reset the value for "color saturation" on signal source and increase "color" on the display until the red, green and blue color patches appear as vivid and bright as the white one in the middle. Increase color saturation on either your signal source or on the display until the red, green and blue color patches appear as vivid and bright as the white one in the middle. ?

Some color channels overexposed

Color channel overexposed
The fade from white to pale bright gray appears to have a distinct color instead of being neutral gray.
Cannot happen with a CRT screen. Check your signal source. Adjust the "color temperature" of the display, or lower the separate red/green/blue levels until the white and bright gray fade all have the same color. ?

Gamma too high

Gamma too high
The fade from black to dark gray is very visible but the fade from bright gray to white is hardly visible.
Cannot be adjusted on a CRT display. Check the settings of your signal source. Check the gamma settings of your display. If this is not enough, check the gamma of your signal source. ?

Gamma too low

Gamma too low
The fade from black to dark gray is hardly visible but the fade from bright gray to white is very visible.
Cannot be adjusted on a CRT display. Check the settings of your signal source. Check the gamma settings of your display. If this is not enough, check the gamma of your signal source. ?

Scaling artifacts

Scaling artifacts
Image detail is lost or appears jaggy.
This cannot be caused by a CRT display itself. Check the scaling settings of your signal source. Check the scaling settings of your signal source and make sure it matches the native resolution of your display device.


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