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BattleComp Vintage VST compressor


The parameters are placed in the same order as the internal routing. Top ones come first.

flowchart

Parameter Description
Big freq. A 6 dB/oct highpass filter on the side chain that goes into the envelope follower. If you hear the deep bass / sub bass causing the compressor to "pump", simply increase the frequency of this. Increasing this frequency too much will produce too loud transients in the bass.
Affect highs The further you increase this parameter, the more treble the output will have. By increasing this the compressor will not compress the treble as much as usually. This parameter affects a wide area around 4000-16000 Hz.
Affect mids The further you increase this parameter, the more mid area frequencies the output will have. By increasing this the compressor will not compress the mids as much as usually. This parameter affects a wide area around 600-2500 Hz.
Affect lows The further you increase this parameter, the more bass the output will have. By increasing this the compressor will not compress the bass as much as usually. This parameter affects a wide area around 80-300 Hz. I chose some relatively high frequencies for the bass because you already have control over the really deep bass by using the first parameter - the highpass filter.
Threshold The threshold at which the compressor is supposed to set in. This compressor is not a soft-knee compressor, but because of the way the timings behave, is will feel like a soft-knee compressor. You might have to set the threshold a bit lower than you are used to with other compressors.
Ratio Ratio works like any other compressor. You can think of it as a mix between wet and dry signal.
Attack The speed of how fast the compressor is to react to transients. Too short attack time will make the sound flat. Too long attack times will make the compressor do almost nothing at all. As a rule-of-thumb you can use short attack times (0.5 - 3 ms) for drums, and slower attack times for slower instruments.
Release Adjusts how fast the compressor is to "let go" when a transient is over. Too short release time will make the sound fuzzy or un-even. Too long release times will make the compressor do almost nothing at all. As a rule-of-thumb you can use short release times (3 - 30 ms) for drums, and slower release times for slower instruments.
Gain Because compression is basically an attenuation of the sound level, you'll need to counter-adjust to make up for the lost gain. This is also a handy way to "drive" the output stage mentioned below:
Curve shape You can use a bit of waveshaping to make the mix more "phat". The curve applied resembles the electronic response curve found in tube valve electronics. Leave this in the middle to disable. (This is not a "knee" curve btw.)
0 dB clip OFF: Bypass this step, allowing the output to exceed 0 dB in the peaks.
Sinus: Apply a sinus shaped clip limiter to the output, keeping the signal below 0 dB.
Sinus-wrap: Like the above but with more soft harmonic overtones.
Sharp sinus: Much like "sinus" but slightly more punchy and less round.
Atan: Inverse tangens - a more dirty clipper that adds more edge.

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